New Field. Field 10.

Field 10

In today’s blog, I would like to feature a new plot we started this season. It’s called Field 10. The spring management class started working on Field 10 as soon as we could. Starting in April, we used our BCS tiller for the primary tillage and continued to work the ground as the weather permitted. It took lots of hands to remove rocks, weeds, and rotate the soil to prep. Our goals were to have it measured and planted for early season crops.

Field 10 is located on the northwest side of the garden with a southern slope.   Partial shade covers the plants in the morning but afternoon sun is strong and keeps us growing. The width is 65 feet and the length around 30 feet. We have six rows that measure 30 inches each, with a 12-inch space in between. Then a 3-foot barrier next to the fence line was added for easy access and lined with thick landscape fabric. The fence is a four-foot-high chicken wire that was dug into a trench for stabilization and to keep critters from digging underneath. Once it was measured out it really started to take shape.

The first row consists of Asparagus, which will come up every year. Then we started with planting the other end of field with Kale, that was covered with paper mulch that we cut with holes for our crop. Down that same row we planted more Kale and Kohlrabi. The second row has flowering broccoli and cauliflower. The third row has red and green cabbage. The fourth row started a second planting of Kale then more red cabbage. The last and closest row to the asparagus was planted with Napa Cabbage, Kohlrabi, and Fennel.

So far, we have had some pest damage from deer and the cabbage looper. We will be using VHS tape around the fence to make noise to scare our deer. There will also be an additional trellis on the fence to try to keep them out.   Some deterrents for the looper can include botanical and citrus oils, sprinkle leaves with cornmeal or rye flour, or purchase resistant varieties. They can also be handpicked most will hide on the underside of the leaves along the leaf veins. Make sure to crush any yellow bullet shaped eggs found on the leaves. As always try organic methods and be proactive with diagnostics.

Happy farming and don’t forget to take the time to enjoy your space.

By Alissa Lick-  2017 NWTC Bounty Garden Intern

Field 10 2

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